Jamrul Fruit

Jamrul java apple

Jamrul or Water Apple or Java Apple or Wax Apple is a tree native to Southeast Asia and widely occurring elsewhere, having been introduced as an ornamental tree and fruit. The tree has been variously attributed to the genus Eugenia Syzygium, where time seems to have been accepted on a permanent basis.

There have been some species attributed to it, but now several varieties with different colors of fruit are all recognized as Syzygium. Syzygium jambos has several common names, reflecting the large number of regions in which it manifests itself as a tree garden or fruit or as an invader.

The names include Malabar Plum, chambakka, Chom Chom-pu or Phu. Terms such as plum rose, water apple, Malay apple, jambrosade, and Pomarrosa, or the English equivalent, rose apple. Many of these names are also applied to other species of Syzygium.

The Jambu name for this fruit is probably limited to one or two of the twenty major Indian languages, while most of the other languages ​​use similar words Jaamun, Jaambhool, etc. to another fruit, smaller than the rose apple, and dark purple as the fruit of the eggplant.

In Karnataka the common English name is rose apple and the common name is Pannerale Paneer Hannu, while the name for the other is eral. This confusion of common names in horticulture is nothing unusual also known as Boga Jamuk in Assamese and Jamrul in Bengali.

Syzygium Jambos leaves and fruits. The young leaves are a glossy red when he grows up, but become dark green at maturity. Jambos Syzygium is a large shrub or small tree of medium size, high-typically three to 15 meters, with a tendency to lower branching. Its leaves and twigs are hairless and bark, dark brown, however, is quite smooth too, with little relief or texture. The leaves are lance-shaped, two cm to 4 cm wide, 10 cm to 20 cm long, pointed, base cuneate almost no petiole, bright red when he grows up, but dark, glossy green on reaching full size. The flowers are small terminal clusters, white or greenish white, long, many stamens, giving them a diameter of 5-8 cm. In temperate regions the tree is flowering in summer.

The edible fruit of Syzygium the shape of some types of guava, for which the plant is quite closely related. Indeed, the fruit is so like the guava in appearance that people are not familiar with it can exchange for a guava on sight. However, the fragrance, flavor and texture are different, and instead of containing dozens of small hard seeds, immersed in a gelatinous tissue, as does guava, the fruit of Syzygium jambos usually contains one or two large, semi unarmed, about one cm in diameter, lying loose in the cavity a bit 'fluffy maturation.

Shaking a fruit to see if the seeds rattle, gives some indication of whether it is ripe. The skin is thin and waxy. The flowers are described by some as fragrant, though this seems to be an attribute variable. The ripe fruit, however, has a strong, pleasant floral bouquet, from which the common names like Rose apple and Pomarrosa. There are many varieties of Syzygium the world, including wild trees anonymous. In Thailand the most common variety grown wears a pale green fruit. Variety Malaysians generally have red skins.



In many regions of the fruit is a shade of pale yellow, often with a slight blush. The skin is thin and waxy, and the hollow core contains a small amount of fluff insignificant. The flesh is crunchy and watery, and the taste is characteristic, which leads to some fanciful descriptions such as like a cross between nashi and bell pepper, with a delicate rose scent and a little bitter aftertaste. There seems to be considerable variation in flavor if such a description has no merit; in South Africa, for example, there is no obvious bitter aftertaste, but the bouquet is very assertive, when you consider how pink like it or not.

Syzygium Jambos is native to Southeast Asia but is naturalized in India, especially the state of Kerala was also introduced widely in all continents except Antarctica, and has established and invasive in different regions. Concern has been expressed regarding the threat of different ecosystems, including those in different islands of Hawaii, Reunion Island, the Galapagos Islands, parts of Australia and the warmer parts of the Americas.



Rich in vitamin C, the fruit can be eaten raw or used in various regional recipes. In the countries of south-east Asia, rose apple fruit is often served with spiced sugar. The wood is dense and therefore is used as a carbon source. The tree is rich in tannins that are of some interest antimicrobial. Some parts of the plant are used in traditional medicine in the region.

Comments

  1. This is new for me, I've never seen such wax apples. Nice shot!

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  2. Greetings, Kalyan. Thanks for stopping by our blog.

    This is an interesting photo...I've not seen apples with this color of configuration...these look similar to an onion to me. Fascinating!

    ReplyDelete
  3. hey, what are these?? pieces of decoration?? candles?? :O

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  4. These look like they could be candles! A very appropriate name for them! Wax appples!

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